Thursday, December 26, 2013

Q*BERT FOR COLECOVISION IS *FUN* - BUT LIKE DRIVING, DOESN'T WORK TOO WELL WITH HOLDING UP A CAMERA WITH THE OTHER HAND!

Like Pac-Man, the only control used with Q*Bert (although diagonal jumping) is the directional handle, no buttons for firing (like in Galaga and Dig Dug) are required.  

Except holding an Android to film a little gameplay doesn't go over well  - JUST like people who yap on their phones while trying to drive.  I do better with my Kodak placed in one spot and filming the monitor like in my "live gaming" videos in the past.

I'd actually gotten the Atari 2600 version of Q*Bert, which I thought was lacking gameplay to begin with (only the red ball, Coily and color-changing Slick and his sunglasses are present - no Ugg and Wrong-Way jumping on the sides of the cubes - and that's taking away a lot of the challenge right there!

The Coleco version got it half-assed right.  First of all, the only character of the side-hopping duo on this version is Wrong-Way - even though as you can see below, is credited as Ugg (the armless pig and Wrong-Way's purple counterpart villain).  And I believe both Slick and Sam appear to make trouble for you - and even more frequently than in the arcade version!

If I had to choose which one I would have gotten back in the day, hands down Coleco Vision.  Their version of Donkey Kong and DK Junior was tons better than the Atari 2600 versions, as well as so many other games on that platform being much better than the VERY "blocky" and starting-to-look-WAY-outdated 2600 cartridges.  I think the Atari game designers were making their games TERRIBLE on PURPOSE - like Coleco goons working undercover at Atari and causing gaming bullshit behind the scenes, which led to the so-called "Video Game Crash of '83".  It was that shitty E.T. game (which I actually have the cartridge LOL!!) that ultimately bombed the whole system and everything with it, all together at once.  Fun while it lasted - and 3 years later, the Nintendo/NES was twenty times better than both early 80's systems. 

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